Hepatitis B surface Ag

Description: 
Qualitative chemiluminescent immunoassay (CLIA) for the detection of Hepatitis B surface antigen in serum. This test is used to diagnose current infection with Hepatitis B virus. Confirmed positive patients undergo further testing for Hepatitis B e antigen and e antibody and a second sample is required for this. DO NOT test within 2 weeks subsequent to a Hepatitis B vaccination dose as this interferes with assay interpretation. This assay is available as a screening test Mon to Sun.
Clinical details: 
Hepatitis B infection affects an estimated 350 million people and accounts for 1 million deaths worldwide. Infection, particularly if acquired in infancy can remain lifelong and lead to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Hepatitis B can be transmitted from mother to child during childbirth (commonest route in high prevalence areas), through sexual contact or through injecting drug use. The risk of having chronic infection mostly reflects the prevalence in a persons country of birth. Ante-natal screening and vaccination of at risk infants has been incredibly effective at reducing transmission of hepatitis B. Proper clinical monitoring and treatment where appropriate can significantly reduce the likelihood of complications of Hepatitis B.
Reference range: 

Not Applicable

Units: 
Qualitative Test - Detected/Not Detected
Sample type and Volume required: 
2.5 - 5 ml Yellow Top Serum Separation Tube (SST) Clotted Blood (for Serum). Note: If using Electronic Patient Record (EPR) please order "Hepatitis B surface Ag".
Turnaround time: 
3 working days
Storage and transport: 
Place labelled sample in a sealed sample bag and send to Central Specimen Reception (CSR). To prevent sample haemolysis please store samples in refrigerator if a delay in sending samples to CSR is unavoidable.
Contacts:
Infection Sciences Department at St Thomas' Hospital
020 7188 8008
St Thomas' Hospital
North Wing - 5th Floor
Westminster Bridge Road
London SE1 7EH
Core opening hours: Monday-Friday 0900-1730


For clinical advice or interpretation of results, please contact the laboratory in the first instance.

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Last updated: 04/12/2017